The 'people factor' in ecommerce

The 'people factor' in ecommerce

The 'people factor' in ecommerce

The 'people factor' in ecommerce

Dive into the dynamics of ecommerce success with strategist Cis Scherpereel. Explore human influence, neuromarketing, and the future of video commerce in this insightful journey.

Dive into the dynamics of ecommerce success with strategist Cis Scherpereel. Explore human influence, neuromarketing, and the future of video commerce in this insightful journey.

Mollie-guides

Apr 11, 2023

Cis Scherpereel

Ecommerce strategist

This blog post has been authored by ecommerce strategist Cis Scherpereel.

Brands, resources, and people – three formidable factors steering an ecommerce project. Or causing it to falter. Undoubtedly, the technological groundwork is crucial, but let's not underestimate the human touch. As something becomes rarer – like human interaction during a digital process – its value inevitably rises.


This blog post has been authored by ecommerce strategist Cis Scherpereel.

Brands, resources, and people – three formidable factors steering an ecommerce project. Or causing it to falter. Undoubtedly, the technological groundwork is crucial, but let's not underestimate the human touch. As something becomes rarer – like human interaction during a digital process – its value inevitably rises.


This blog post has been authored by ecommerce strategist Cis Scherpereel.

Brands, resources, and people – three formidable factors steering an ecommerce project. Or causing it to falter. Undoubtedly, the technological groundwork is crucial, but let's not underestimate the human touch. As something becomes rarer – like human interaction during a digital process – its value inevitably rises.


This blog post has been authored by ecommerce strategist Cis Scherpereel.

Brands, resources, and people – three formidable factors steering an ecommerce project. Or causing it to falter. Undoubtedly, the technological groundwork is crucial, but let's not underestimate the human touch. As something becomes rarer – like human interaction during a digital process – its value inevitably rises.


Scarcity's Ascension in Value

Take Brooklyn, a multi-brand fashion retailer with five stores in Flanders, for instance. Here, store staff took the initiative to assist customers via chat, not merely during regular store hours, but extending their support until half-past nine in the evening. Behind this initiative, born during the pandemic and still thriving, lies a straightforward schedule and an abundance of passion for the customer.

Given the prevalence of chatbots and the occasional unresponsiveness of many webshops during crucial moments, what Brooklyn is doing goes beyond the ordinary. A live, knowledgeable person can make a significant difference for the consumer grappling with decision-making. The essence of this initiative lies not in the chat tool itself but in the human touch on the other side.

To delve deeper into the narrative behind Brooklyn, you can listen to the podcast featuring CEO Ubbe Descamps on Spotify.

Take Brooklyn, a multi-brand fashion retailer with five stores in Flanders, for instance. Here, store staff took the initiative to assist customers via chat, not merely during regular store hours, but extending their support until half-past nine in the evening. Behind this initiative, born during the pandemic and still thriving, lies a straightforward schedule and an abundance of passion for the customer.

Given the prevalence of chatbots and the occasional unresponsiveness of many webshops during crucial moments, what Brooklyn is doing goes beyond the ordinary. A live, knowledgeable person can make a significant difference for the consumer grappling with decision-making. The essence of this initiative lies not in the chat tool itself but in the human touch on the other side.

To delve deeper into the narrative behind Brooklyn, you can listen to the podcast featuring CEO Ubbe Descamps on Spotify.

Take Brooklyn, a multi-brand fashion retailer with five stores in Flanders, for instance. Here, store staff took the initiative to assist customers via chat, not merely during regular store hours, but extending their support until half-past nine in the evening. Behind this initiative, born during the pandemic and still thriving, lies a straightforward schedule and an abundance of passion for the customer.

Given the prevalence of chatbots and the occasional unresponsiveness of many webshops during crucial moments, what Brooklyn is doing goes beyond the ordinary. A live, knowledgeable person can make a significant difference for the consumer grappling with decision-making. The essence of this initiative lies not in the chat tool itself but in the human touch on the other side.

To delve deeper into the narrative behind Brooklyn, you can listen to the podcast featuring CEO Ubbe Descamps on Spotify.

Take Brooklyn, a multi-brand fashion retailer with five stores in Flanders, for instance. Here, store staff took the initiative to assist customers via chat, not merely during regular store hours, but extending their support until half-past nine in the evening. Behind this initiative, born during the pandemic and still thriving, lies a straightforward schedule and an abundance of passion for the customer.

Given the prevalence of chatbots and the occasional unresponsiveness of many webshops during crucial moments, what Brooklyn is doing goes beyond the ordinary. A live, knowledgeable person can make a significant difference for the consumer grappling with decision-making. The essence of this initiative lies not in the chat tool itself but in the human touch on the other side.

To delve deeper into the narrative behind Brooklyn, you can listen to the podcast featuring CEO Ubbe Descamps on Spotify.

Consumers Eagerly Yield to Influence

Data affords us a glimpse into understanding the customer's purchasing behavior. The focus predominantly rests on the rational aspects of behavior – logic and predictable patterns. As though a person is purely rational. Does this approach not confine the consumer to a rigid category? Is the consumer genuinely themselves during a purchasing process?

Allow me to take you through my somewhat intricate journey. My sportswear often comes from Decathlon, but when it comes to a bike, I find myself exploring options at Canyon. Online, I procure my badminton and padel rackets at a considerably lower cost. Decent shoes are best sourced from the local sports store, while my cycling helmet finds its home at the specialized bike shop. As for my cycling glasses, I'm still on the lookout for the right and trustworthy channel. I seamlessly switch between local retailers, brands, and online and offline avenues, often without conscious realization.

As a consumer, I don't neatly fit into one profile; my motivations can be vastly different. Choices are made consciously or unconsciously, and impulsivity often plays a role. I like to believe I have everything under control and remain uninfluenced...

Our Brain's Art of Deception

Neuromarketers have a different perspective. Consumers, it turns out, make far fewer conscious choices than they might think.

The surge in interest in neuromarketing can be attributed to the availability of data sources tracing the consumer's journey. Google Analytics, Search Console, and numerous alternatives paint dashboards with figures and trends – rational data.

Emotional content is increasingly finding its place in the spotlight – NPS comments, heatmaps, product reviews, store pathways, and the like. This data may be somewhat fuzzier, but its value is heightened when it comes to truly understanding the customer.

Failure to delve into the consumer's head and heart means missing out on certain layers in the art of influence. Moreover, the consumer's brain is adept at deceiving. Consumers convince themselves that they're making a highly conscious choice, emphasizing reasons that rationalize the purchase.

The AIDA Alibi Model

When faced with an excessive array of choices on a webshop or in-store, decisions tend to be suboptimal, or worse, not made at all. Extensive options induce decision stress within our brains.

By spotlighting top products on the webshop and attaching an emotional label, such as "94% of buyers highly recommend this product," we provide consumers with an alibi justifying the purchase. This approach flips the well-known AIDA model (Attention, Interest, Desire, Action) on its head. Essentially, the decision is made as soon as a product grabs your attention – the A for action. Subsequently, the purchase is rationalized both rationally and emotionally (Desire and Interest). After the initial decision, reasons are conjured to legitimize the purchase. The first A in AIDA is more aptly named Alibi.

"Because you're worth it" – the enduring slogan of L'Oréal – holds its ground for over 50 years. A brilliant illustration of an alibi serving as a trigger for a purchase decision.

View the YouTube video here.

Ritualtainment

Our brains deem information more trustworthy when it comes from people we like. Brands that exude a personality people can relate to, such as L'Oréal, establish a stronger connection with the consumer. Each individual is uniquely sensitive to this connection.

Consumers, furthermore, prefer feeling like the protagonist in an immersive brand story, steering clear of being mere targets in a marketing campaign. Today's consumer is undeniably savvy.

The term "Ritualtainment," borrowed from retail designer Ibrahim Ibrahim, perfectly encapsulates how rituals and a dash of entertainment can influence the consumer's purchasing process.

In the Ohlala lingerie store, for instance, a gift voucher is offered, promising to be in your hands within three minutes. An hourglass at the counter makes this promise tangible. The ritual unfolding in the store entices the rational male buyer, blending an element of play with a touch of entertainment.

View the YouTube video here.

Jumbo supermarkets' chat checkouts also exemplify Ritualtainment. Older consumers, in this case, form an attachment not based on products or offerings but on the human and emotional factor.

The English language offers a witty play on words:

"The difference between TILL (box office) and THRILL (experience) is HR. In the end, it's all about people."

Data affords us a glimpse into understanding the customer's purchasing behavior. The focus predominantly rests on the rational aspects of behavior – logic and predictable patterns. As though a person is purely rational. Does this approach not confine the consumer to a rigid category? Is the consumer genuinely themselves during a purchasing process?

Allow me to take you through my somewhat intricate journey. My sportswear often comes from Decathlon, but when it comes to a bike, I find myself exploring options at Canyon. Online, I procure my badminton and padel rackets at a considerably lower cost. Decent shoes are best sourced from the local sports store, while my cycling helmet finds its home at the specialized bike shop. As for my cycling glasses, I'm still on the lookout for the right and trustworthy channel. I seamlessly switch between local retailers, brands, and online and offline avenues, often without conscious realization.

As a consumer, I don't neatly fit into one profile; my motivations can be vastly different. Choices are made consciously or unconsciously, and impulsivity often plays a role. I like to believe I have everything under control and remain uninfluenced...

Our Brain's Art of Deception

Neuromarketers have a different perspective. Consumers, it turns out, make far fewer conscious choices than they might think.

The surge in interest in neuromarketing can be attributed to the availability of data sources tracing the consumer's journey. Google Analytics, Search Console, and numerous alternatives paint dashboards with figures and trends – rational data.

Emotional content is increasingly finding its place in the spotlight – NPS comments, heatmaps, product reviews, store pathways, and the like. This data may be somewhat fuzzier, but its value is heightened when it comes to truly understanding the customer.

Failure to delve into the consumer's head and heart means missing out on certain layers in the art of influence. Moreover, the consumer's brain is adept at deceiving. Consumers convince themselves that they're making a highly conscious choice, emphasizing reasons that rationalize the purchase.

The AIDA Alibi Model

When faced with an excessive array of choices on a webshop or in-store, decisions tend to be suboptimal, or worse, not made at all. Extensive options induce decision stress within our brains.

By spotlighting top products on the webshop and attaching an emotional label, such as "94% of buyers highly recommend this product," we provide consumers with an alibi justifying the purchase. This approach flips the well-known AIDA model (Attention, Interest, Desire, Action) on its head. Essentially, the decision is made as soon as a product grabs your attention – the A for action. Subsequently, the purchase is rationalized both rationally and emotionally (Desire and Interest). After the initial decision, reasons are conjured to legitimize the purchase. The first A in AIDA is more aptly named Alibi.

"Because you're worth it" – the enduring slogan of L'Oréal – holds its ground for over 50 years. A brilliant illustration of an alibi serving as a trigger for a purchase decision.

View the YouTube video here.

Ritualtainment

Our brains deem information more trustworthy when it comes from people we like. Brands that exude a personality people can relate to, such as L'Oréal, establish a stronger connection with the consumer. Each individual is uniquely sensitive to this connection.

Consumers, furthermore, prefer feeling like the protagonist in an immersive brand story, steering clear of being mere targets in a marketing campaign. Today's consumer is undeniably savvy.

The term "Ritualtainment," borrowed from retail designer Ibrahim Ibrahim, perfectly encapsulates how rituals and a dash of entertainment can influence the consumer's purchasing process.

In the Ohlala lingerie store, for instance, a gift voucher is offered, promising to be in your hands within three minutes. An hourglass at the counter makes this promise tangible. The ritual unfolding in the store entices the rational male buyer, blending an element of play with a touch of entertainment.

View the YouTube video here.

Jumbo supermarkets' chat checkouts also exemplify Ritualtainment. Older consumers, in this case, form an attachment not based on products or offerings but on the human and emotional factor.

The English language offers a witty play on words:

"The difference between TILL (box office) and THRILL (experience) is HR. In the end, it's all about people."

Data affords us a glimpse into understanding the customer's purchasing behavior. The focus predominantly rests on the rational aspects of behavior – logic and predictable patterns. As though a person is purely rational. Does this approach not confine the consumer to a rigid category? Is the consumer genuinely themselves during a purchasing process?

Allow me to take you through my somewhat intricate journey. My sportswear often comes from Decathlon, but when it comes to a bike, I find myself exploring options at Canyon. Online, I procure my badminton and padel rackets at a considerably lower cost. Decent shoes are best sourced from the local sports store, while my cycling helmet finds its home at the specialized bike shop. As for my cycling glasses, I'm still on the lookout for the right and trustworthy channel. I seamlessly switch between local retailers, brands, and online and offline avenues, often without conscious realization.

As a consumer, I don't neatly fit into one profile; my motivations can be vastly different. Choices are made consciously or unconsciously, and impulsivity often plays a role. I like to believe I have everything under control and remain uninfluenced...

Our Brain's Art of Deception

Neuromarketers have a different perspective. Consumers, it turns out, make far fewer conscious choices than they might think.

The surge in interest in neuromarketing can be attributed to the availability of data sources tracing the consumer's journey. Google Analytics, Search Console, and numerous alternatives paint dashboards with figures and trends – rational data.

Emotional content is increasingly finding its place in the spotlight – NPS comments, heatmaps, product reviews, store pathways, and the like. This data may be somewhat fuzzier, but its value is heightened when it comes to truly understanding the customer.

Failure to delve into the consumer's head and heart means missing out on certain layers in the art of influence. Moreover, the consumer's brain is adept at deceiving. Consumers convince themselves that they're making a highly conscious choice, emphasizing reasons that rationalize the purchase.

The AIDA Alibi Model

When faced with an excessive array of choices on a webshop or in-store, decisions tend to be suboptimal, or worse, not made at all. Extensive options induce decision stress within our brains.

By spotlighting top products on the webshop and attaching an emotional label, such as "94% of buyers highly recommend this product," we provide consumers with an alibi justifying the purchase. This approach flips the well-known AIDA model (Attention, Interest, Desire, Action) on its head. Essentially, the decision is made as soon as a product grabs your attention – the A for action. Subsequently, the purchase is rationalized both rationally and emotionally (Desire and Interest). After the initial decision, reasons are conjured to legitimize the purchase. The first A in AIDA is more aptly named Alibi.

"Because you're worth it" – the enduring slogan of L'Oréal – holds its ground for over 50 years. A brilliant illustration of an alibi serving as a trigger for a purchase decision.

View the YouTube video here.

Ritualtainment

Our brains deem information more trustworthy when it comes from people we like. Brands that exude a personality people can relate to, such as L'Oréal, establish a stronger connection with the consumer. Each individual is uniquely sensitive to this connection.

Consumers, furthermore, prefer feeling like the protagonist in an immersive brand story, steering clear of being mere targets in a marketing campaign. Today's consumer is undeniably savvy.

The term "Ritualtainment," borrowed from retail designer Ibrahim Ibrahim, perfectly encapsulates how rituals and a dash of entertainment can influence the consumer's purchasing process.

In the Ohlala lingerie store, for instance, a gift voucher is offered, promising to be in your hands within three minutes. An hourglass at the counter makes this promise tangible. The ritual unfolding in the store entices the rational male buyer, blending an element of play with a touch of entertainment.

View the YouTube video here.

Jumbo supermarkets' chat checkouts also exemplify Ritualtainment. Older consumers, in this case, form an attachment not based on products or offerings but on the human and emotional factor.

The English language offers a witty play on words:

"The difference between TILL (box office) and THRILL (experience) is HR. In the end, it's all about people."

Data affords us a glimpse into understanding the customer's purchasing behavior. The focus predominantly rests on the rational aspects of behavior – logic and predictable patterns. As though a person is purely rational. Does this approach not confine the consumer to a rigid category? Is the consumer genuinely themselves during a purchasing process?

Allow me to take you through my somewhat intricate journey. My sportswear often comes from Decathlon, but when it comes to a bike, I find myself exploring options at Canyon. Online, I procure my badminton and padel rackets at a considerably lower cost. Decent shoes are best sourced from the local sports store, while my cycling helmet finds its home at the specialized bike shop. As for my cycling glasses, I'm still on the lookout for the right and trustworthy channel. I seamlessly switch between local retailers, brands, and online and offline avenues, often without conscious realization.

As a consumer, I don't neatly fit into one profile; my motivations can be vastly different. Choices are made consciously or unconsciously, and impulsivity often plays a role. I like to believe I have everything under control and remain uninfluenced...

Our Brain's Art of Deception

Neuromarketers have a different perspective. Consumers, it turns out, make far fewer conscious choices than they might think.

The surge in interest in neuromarketing can be attributed to the availability of data sources tracing the consumer's journey. Google Analytics, Search Console, and numerous alternatives paint dashboards with figures and trends – rational data.

Emotional content is increasingly finding its place in the spotlight – NPS comments, heatmaps, product reviews, store pathways, and the like. This data may be somewhat fuzzier, but its value is heightened when it comes to truly understanding the customer.

Failure to delve into the consumer's head and heart means missing out on certain layers in the art of influence. Moreover, the consumer's brain is adept at deceiving. Consumers convince themselves that they're making a highly conscious choice, emphasizing reasons that rationalize the purchase.

The AIDA Alibi Model

When faced with an excessive array of choices on a webshop or in-store, decisions tend to be suboptimal, or worse, not made at all. Extensive options induce decision stress within our brains.

By spotlighting top products on the webshop and attaching an emotional label, such as "94% of buyers highly recommend this product," we provide consumers with an alibi justifying the purchase. This approach flips the well-known AIDA model (Attention, Interest, Desire, Action) on its head. Essentially, the decision is made as soon as a product grabs your attention – the A for action. Subsequently, the purchase is rationalized both rationally and emotionally (Desire and Interest). After the initial decision, reasons are conjured to legitimize the purchase. The first A in AIDA is more aptly named Alibi.

"Because you're worth it" – the enduring slogan of L'Oréal – holds its ground for over 50 years. A brilliant illustration of an alibi serving as a trigger for a purchase decision.

View the YouTube video here.

Ritualtainment

Our brains deem information more trustworthy when it comes from people we like. Brands that exude a personality people can relate to, such as L'Oréal, establish a stronger connection with the consumer. Each individual is uniquely sensitive to this connection.

Consumers, furthermore, prefer feeling like the protagonist in an immersive brand story, steering clear of being mere targets in a marketing campaign. Today's consumer is undeniably savvy.

The term "Ritualtainment," borrowed from retail designer Ibrahim Ibrahim, perfectly encapsulates how rituals and a dash of entertainment can influence the consumer's purchasing process.

In the Ohlala lingerie store, for instance, a gift voucher is offered, promising to be in your hands within three minutes. An hourglass at the counter makes this promise tangible. The ritual unfolding in the store entices the rational male buyer, blending an element of play with a touch of entertainment.

View the YouTube video here.

Jumbo supermarkets' chat checkouts also exemplify Ritualtainment. Older consumers, in this case, form an attachment not based on products or offerings but on the human and emotional factor.

The English language offers a witty play on words:

"The difference between TILL (box office) and THRILL (experience) is HR. In the end, it's all about people."

It’s all about people

Emotion and seduction, highly personal and human factors, can also be leveraged in ecommerce. The rise of social commerce is not coincidental; it enriches the ecommerce spectrum. How we respond to offers pushed to us on social media is often impulsive and distinct from our approach to a webshop or marketplace on our laptops.

Playing on the alibi that justifies our impulsive purchases stems from lessons learned in physical stores.

When a saleswoman proudly recounts the perfect fish dish served thanks to a somewhat pricey pan, turning her Christmas Eve into a memorable evening, I find myself swayed. A minute later, I stand at the checkout with that pan. The emotion of her personal story overrides my rational thinking that deems the pan a tad expensive. Her sales technique aims to persuade me of the added value of the pricier pan through her personal recommendation. Without that human touch, I might have settled for a cheaper pan off the shelf.

A particularly amusing video illustrates the potent influence people have on each other in the purchasing process.

View the YouTube video here.

Video Commerce

To make ecommerce more human, integrating lessons from the physical world is crucial.

Live (one-on-one) video chats, where sellers promote products and guide consumers in making the right purchase choices, emulate the physical store experience most closely. It remains to be seen how Western consumers will respond to or embrace this approach in the future. In this video from Uptok, a provider of software for video chat on webshops, we get a glimpse of what's to come.

View the YouTube video here.

Conclusion

The human factor in ecommerce is an invaluable asset for successfully operating a webshop. However, there's still a journey ahead to seamlessly integrate lessons from the physical world into the online process. As our world becomes increasingly digital, the importance we place on human interaction will only intensify.

About Cis Scherpereel

In 2021, Cis Scherpereel was honored as the very first Ecommerce Personality of the Year in Belgium by Safeshops and Bol.com. An unfair advantage indeed. He is the co-founder of Mex United and, as an ecommerce strategist, has assisted numerous retailers in utilizing ecommerce effectively. Connect – Inspire – Share. This encapsulates how Cis defines his first name and expresses his passion for knowledge sharing. Cis is a teacher, strategist, author, and the podcast host of De E-commerce Podcast.

Listen to "De E-commerce Podcast" here.

Emotion and seduction, highly personal and human factors, can also be leveraged in ecommerce. The rise of social commerce is not coincidental; it enriches the ecommerce spectrum. How we respond to offers pushed to us on social media is often impulsive and distinct from our approach to a webshop or marketplace on our laptops.

Playing on the alibi that justifies our impulsive purchases stems from lessons learned in physical stores.

When a saleswoman proudly recounts the perfect fish dish served thanks to a somewhat pricey pan, turning her Christmas Eve into a memorable evening, I find myself swayed. A minute later, I stand at the checkout with that pan. The emotion of her personal story overrides my rational thinking that deems the pan a tad expensive. Her sales technique aims to persuade me of the added value of the pricier pan through her personal recommendation. Without that human touch, I might have settled for a cheaper pan off the shelf.

A particularly amusing video illustrates the potent influence people have on each other in the purchasing process.

View the YouTube video here.

Video Commerce

To make ecommerce more human, integrating lessons from the physical world is crucial.

Live (one-on-one) video chats, where sellers promote products and guide consumers in making the right purchase choices, emulate the physical store experience most closely. It remains to be seen how Western consumers will respond to or embrace this approach in the future. In this video from Uptok, a provider of software for video chat on webshops, we get a glimpse of what's to come.

View the YouTube video here.

Conclusion

The human factor in ecommerce is an invaluable asset for successfully operating a webshop. However, there's still a journey ahead to seamlessly integrate lessons from the physical world into the online process. As our world becomes increasingly digital, the importance we place on human interaction will only intensify.

About Cis Scherpereel

In 2021, Cis Scherpereel was honored as the very first Ecommerce Personality of the Year in Belgium by Safeshops and Bol.com. An unfair advantage indeed. He is the co-founder of Mex United and, as an ecommerce strategist, has assisted numerous retailers in utilizing ecommerce effectively. Connect – Inspire – Share. This encapsulates how Cis defines his first name and expresses his passion for knowledge sharing. Cis is a teacher, strategist, author, and the podcast host of De E-commerce Podcast.

Listen to "De E-commerce Podcast" here.

Emotion and seduction, highly personal and human factors, can also be leveraged in ecommerce. The rise of social commerce is not coincidental; it enriches the ecommerce spectrum. How we respond to offers pushed to us on social media is often impulsive and distinct from our approach to a webshop or marketplace on our laptops.

Playing on the alibi that justifies our impulsive purchases stems from lessons learned in physical stores.

When a saleswoman proudly recounts the perfect fish dish served thanks to a somewhat pricey pan, turning her Christmas Eve into a memorable evening, I find myself swayed. A minute later, I stand at the checkout with that pan. The emotion of her personal story overrides my rational thinking that deems the pan a tad expensive. Her sales technique aims to persuade me of the added value of the pricier pan through her personal recommendation. Without that human touch, I might have settled for a cheaper pan off the shelf.

A particularly amusing video illustrates the potent influence people have on each other in the purchasing process.

View the YouTube video here.

Video Commerce

To make ecommerce more human, integrating lessons from the physical world is crucial.

Live (one-on-one) video chats, where sellers promote products and guide consumers in making the right purchase choices, emulate the physical store experience most closely. It remains to be seen how Western consumers will respond to or embrace this approach in the future. In this video from Uptok, a provider of software for video chat on webshops, we get a glimpse of what's to come.

View the YouTube video here.

Conclusion

The human factor in ecommerce is an invaluable asset for successfully operating a webshop. However, there's still a journey ahead to seamlessly integrate lessons from the physical world into the online process. As our world becomes increasingly digital, the importance we place on human interaction will only intensify.

About Cis Scherpereel

In 2021, Cis Scherpereel was honored as the very first Ecommerce Personality of the Year in Belgium by Safeshops and Bol.com. An unfair advantage indeed. He is the co-founder of Mex United and, as an ecommerce strategist, has assisted numerous retailers in utilizing ecommerce effectively. Connect – Inspire – Share. This encapsulates how Cis defines his first name and expresses his passion for knowledge sharing. Cis is a teacher, strategist, author, and the podcast host of De E-commerce Podcast.

Listen to "De E-commerce Podcast" here.

Emotion and seduction, highly personal and human factors, can also be leveraged in ecommerce. The rise of social commerce is not coincidental; it enriches the ecommerce spectrum. How we respond to offers pushed to us on social media is often impulsive and distinct from our approach to a webshop or marketplace on our laptops.

Playing on the alibi that justifies our impulsive purchases stems from lessons learned in physical stores.

When a saleswoman proudly recounts the perfect fish dish served thanks to a somewhat pricey pan, turning her Christmas Eve into a memorable evening, I find myself swayed. A minute later, I stand at the checkout with that pan. The emotion of her personal story overrides my rational thinking that deems the pan a tad expensive. Her sales technique aims to persuade me of the added value of the pricier pan through her personal recommendation. Without that human touch, I might have settled for a cheaper pan off the shelf.

A particularly amusing video illustrates the potent influence people have on each other in the purchasing process.

View the YouTube video here.

Video Commerce

To make ecommerce more human, integrating lessons from the physical world is crucial.

Live (one-on-one) video chats, where sellers promote products and guide consumers in making the right purchase choices, emulate the physical store experience most closely. It remains to be seen how Western consumers will respond to or embrace this approach in the future. In this video from Uptok, a provider of software for video chat on webshops, we get a glimpse of what's to come.

View the YouTube video here.

Conclusion

The human factor in ecommerce is an invaluable asset for successfully operating a webshop. However, there's still a journey ahead to seamlessly integrate lessons from the physical world into the online process. As our world becomes increasingly digital, the importance we place on human interaction will only intensify.

About Cis Scherpereel

In 2021, Cis Scherpereel was honored as the very first Ecommerce Personality of the Year in Belgium by Safeshops and Bol.com. An unfair advantage indeed. He is the co-founder of Mex United and, as an ecommerce strategist, has assisted numerous retailers in utilizing ecommerce effectively. Connect – Inspire – Share. This encapsulates how Cis defines his first name and expresses his passion for knowledge sharing. Cis is a teacher, strategist, author, and the podcast host of De E-commerce Podcast.

Listen to "De E-commerce Podcast" here.

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MollieGrowthThe 'people factor' in ecommerce
MollieGrowthThe 'people factor' in ecommerce